FACULTY OF COMMUNICATION

Department of Public Relations and Advertising

GEIN 316 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Innovative Design Strategies
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEIN 316
Fall/Spring
2
2
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course Discussion
Group Work
Problem Solving
Case Study
Lecture / Presentation
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to expose students to design processes and methods for innovative new product development. Students will engage in strategic thinking and research into, for example, the political, economic, social and technological contexts of new products, services or systems. As the outcome of the course, students will propose product concepts and product specifications that are intended for further development.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • The students who succeeded in this course: • Will be able to interpret information that is relevant to a product development problem. • Will be able to execute field research that is relevant to a product development problem. • Will be able to make effective oral and visual presentations of their product development research and of their proposed product concepts. • Will be able to apply techniques to share their ideas in group work. • Will be able to synthesize market trends considering the political, economic, social, and technological developments for innovative product concepts.
Course Description This course will consist of design problems concentrating particularly on the early phases of new product development. Students will work individually or in groups and proceed in stages along a new product development process. They will employ a number of tasks including planning, creative thinking, desk and field research, product concept design, design concept development, preparing and making presentations, and composing business proposals. At the end of the course, students will produce an innovative product concept.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 INTRODUCTION - Course Introduction and Overview - “Design Ladder” Syllabus
2 THE CREATIVE ECONOMY AND DESIGN THINKING - Creative Economy and Today - Introduction to Design Thinking - On Human Creativity - General Principles of Service Design Reading: Tim Brown (2008). Design thinking. Harvard Business Review, 86(6), 84-92.
3 THE CREATIVE ECONOMY AND DESIGN THINKING - Creative Economy and Today - Introduction to Design Thinking - On Human Creativity - General Principles of Service Design Homework: Video & Essay on ‘What we’ve learnt’
4 DESIGN STRATEGIES: Design Strategies Case Studies - What is Strategy? - What is Strategic design? Reading: Rohan Doherty, Cara Wrigley, Judy Matthews, and Sam Bucolo (2014). Climbing the design ladder: Step by step. In Proceedings of the 19th DMI Academic Design Management Conference, London, pp. 2578-2600. & Homework submission
5 DESIGN STRATEGIES: Strategic Design Practice - How to Translate Strategy to Design - Changing Roles of Designers - Discussions: Success Stories on Service Design Strategies Reading: Rohan Doherty, Cara Wrigley, Judy Matthews, and Sam Bucolo (2014). Climbing the design ladder: Step by step. In Proceedings of the 19th DMI Academic Design Management Conference, London, pp. 2578-2600. PRESENTATION 1 Brief
6 DESIGN STRATEGIES Presentation: Success Stories on Service Design Strategies SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS & PRESENTATION
7 DESIGN STRATEGIES Presentation: Success Stories on Service Design Strategies (cont.) PRESENTATION
8 DESIGN STRATEGIES Presentation: Success Stories on Service Design Strategies (cont.) PRESENTATION
9 LIVE OR DIE: INNOVATIVE IDEA FAILURES - Idea Failures Case Studies - Distribution of Presentation 2 Subjects and Student Groups: Creative/Innovative Communications - “Brand Positioning” Analysis Example (Video Screening) Reading: Michael B. Beverland and Francis J. Farrelly (2010). What does it mean to be design-led? Design Management Review, 18(4), 10-17.
10 Discussions: Designing Creative & Innovative Communications for Global Issues PROJECT Brief
11 CREATIVE EXPERIENCES: Designing Creative & Innovative Communications for Global Issues - In-class Study: System Map & User Journey Map Ecosystem Map & User Journey Map
12 DESIGN STRATEGIES Project: Designing Creative & Innovative Communications for Global Issues SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS & PROJECT
13 DESIGN STRATEGIES Project: Designing Creative & Innovative Communications for Global Issues (cont.) PROJECT
14 DESIGN STRATEGIES Project: Designing Creative & Innovative Communications for Global Issues (cont.) PROJECT
15 Review of the Semester None
16 Review of the Semester None

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

-

Suggested Readings/Materials

Bruce, Margaret and J R Bessant. 2002. Design in Business : Strategic Innovation Through Design. Harlow, England ; London ; New York: Financial Times/Prentice Hall.Keinonen, Turkka and Roope Takala. 2006. Product Concept Design : A Review of the Conceptual Design of Products in Industry. New York]: Springer.Kelley, Tom and Jonathan Littman. 2001. The Art of Innovation : Lessons in Creativity From IDEO, America's Leading Design Firm. New York: Currency/Doubleday.Riley, Patrick G. 2002. The OnePage Proposal : How to Get Your Business Pitch Onto One Persuasive Page. New York: ReganBooks.Schifferstein, H and Paul, Hekkert. 2008. Product Experience. San Diego, CA: Elsevier.Snyder, Carolyn. 2003. Paper Prototyping: The Fast and Easy Way to Design and Refine User Interfaces. San Francisco: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers.Squires, Susan and Bryan Byrne. 2002. Creating Breakthrough Ideas : The Collaboration of Anthropologists and Designers in the Product Development Industry. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.Stanton, Neville. 2005. Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics Methods. Boca Raton: CRC Press.Suri, Jane Fulton and Matthew Marsh. 2000. “Scenario Building as an Ergonomics Method in Consumer Product Design.” Applied Ergonomics, vol. 31:151157. Elsevier Science Ltd.Van der Heijden, Kees. 2005. Scenarios : The Art of Strategic Conversation. Chichester, West Sussex ; Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
1
40
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
4
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
0
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: '.16.' x total hours)
16
0
Study Hours Out of Class
0
Field Work
0
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
0
Portfolio
0
Homework / Assignments
0
Presentation / Jury
1
0
Project
0
Seminar / Workshop
0
Oral Exam
0
Midterms
0
Final Exam
0
    Total
0

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to critically interpret theories, concepts, methods, instruments and ideas that form the basis of Public Relations and Advertising field.

2

To be able to collect and use necessary data to produce content in the field of Public Relations and Advertising with scientific methods.

3

To be able to use theoretical knowledge gained in the field of Public Relations and Advertising in practice.

4

To be able to use analytical thinking skills in the field of Public Relations and Advertising.

5

To be able to convey creative ideas and solution suggestions supported by scientific data in written and oral form to stakeholders.

6

To be able to take responsibility as individual and group members to solve problems encountered in the practice of Public Relations and Advertising field.

7

To be able to develop solutions that favor public good and raise awareness by having knowledge about regional, national and global issues and problems.

8

To be able to relate the basic knowledge of other disciplines supporting the field of Public Relations and Advertising with his/her own field of expertise.

9

To be able to use the knowledge, skills and competencies acquired by following regulations, innovations, changes, current developments, and occupational health and safety practices closely in the field of Public Relations and Advertising; in a lifelong manner and for individual and social purposes.

10

To be able to collect, interpret and share data by considering social, scientific and professional ethical values in the field of Public Relations and Advertising.

11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Public Relations and Advertising and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

12

To be able to speak a second foreign at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 


NEWS |ALL NEWS

Izmir University of Economics
is an establishment of
izto logo
Izmir Chamber of Commerce Health and Education Foundation.
ieu logo

Sakarya Street No:156
35330 Balçova - İzmir / Turkey

kampus izmir

Follow Us

İEU © All rights reserved.