GEET 310 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Gender and Media
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEET 310
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
Course Type
Second Foreign Language
Course Level
-
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course conceptualizes gender as a category of knowledge and aims to understand how gender is constructed by the media. We will consider gender as a constitutive element of identity and by analyzing its intersection with other categories such as race, class, nation and sexuality, we will grasp the importance of the representation of gender in media and its meaning for our lives. The course consists of lectures, screenings and discussions revolving around critical analysis of and engagement with contemporary examples of film, television, adverts and new media.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Differentiate between sex and gender
  • Critically explain why gender is a social construct
  • Compare the different waves of feminism and their focus
  • Evaluate the evolution of media with regards to how gender has been constructed and performed across a range of moving image forms and genres
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the constructions of sexuality, gender, race, ethnicity and nation in the media.
  • Gain familiarity of the construction of gender in the media in the present day, with a focus on a variety of different cultures and media across the world
Course Content his course examines various images and representations of gender in media paying particular attention to contemporary discussions. Employing theories from cultural studies, media, film, reception and gender studies, it explores different processes and practices of gender, specifically in terms of media representations of femininity, masculinity and queerness. The media plays a major role in "constructing" gender, and “popular” views of what appropriate gendering is, in turn, shape how we communicate with each other. Participation (20%) – You should come to class prepared to ask questions and ready to make lively, insightful, substantive and respectful contributions to our discussion of the course materials. Written Assignment (20%): These assignments require the students to select a theme we have covered in the class and conduct a detailed analysis of how that example reflects the context in which it was produced/distributed/exhibited.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Course Introduction: Why should and how do we study gender in the media? G. Tuchman, “The Symbolic Annihilation of Women by the Mass Media.” In Culture and Politics: A Reader, Eds. L. Crothers and C. Lockhart. P. 150-174. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000. M. Gallagher, “Media and the Representation of Gender”. In ”The Routledge Companion to Media and Gender. P. 23-31. Eds. C. Carter, L. Steiner and L. McLaughin. London and New York: Routledge, 2014.
2 Gender, sexuality and representation D. Gauntlett, Media, Gender and Identity, London and New York: Routledge, 2002. P. 1-41. S. Hall, “The Work of Representation.” In Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices. Ed. S. Hall. London, California, New Delhi: Sage Publications, 2003.
3 Media and gender: A historical perspective D. Gauntlett, Media, Gender and Identity, London and New York: Routledge, 2002. Chapters 3 and 4, P. 42-90.
4 Femininity and spectacle M. L. Stewart. “The politics and spectacle of fashion and femininity.” Journal of Women's History. 17(1), (2005): 192-200. J. Gerhard. “Sex and the City: Carrie Bradshaw's queer postfeminism. Feminist Media Studies”. 5(1), (2005): 37-49. Screening: Sex and the City, Season 4 Episode 2 ‘The Real Me’ (1998-2004, HBO) First in class activity: write a few sentences on the representation of femininity in the Sex and the City episode we have seen and make a discussion about your position. You will hand it in at the end of the class.
5 Cinematic representations of masculinity S. Cohan and I. R. Hark. (Eds.) Screening the Male: Exploring Masculinities in Hollywood Cinema. London and New York: Routledge, 2002. P. 1-22. (Introduction and Prologue). L. M. Ta. “Hurt so good: Fight Club, masculine violence, and the crisis of capitalism.” The Journal of American Culture, 29(3), (2006) 265-277. Screening: Fight Club (David Fincher, 1999) First Written Assignment: Feminity, Masculinity and Media Analysis (Short Review)
6 Gender, race and media L. Young. Fear of the Dark: 'Race', Gender and Sexuality in the Cinema. London & New York: Routledge, 1996. P. 5-40. (Chapters 1 and 2) R. M. Entman and A.Rojecki. The black image in the white mind: Media and race in America. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2000. P. 205-226.(Chapter 12) Screening: Django Unchained (Quentin Tarantino, 2012)
7 Gender, class and media R. A. Lind, Race and Gender in Electronic Media: Content, Context, Culture. New York and London: Routledge, 2016. P. 1-18. Y. Tasker. Working girls: Gender and sexuality in popular cinema. London & New York: Routledge, 2002. P. 1-18. Screening: Shameless USA (Showtime, 2011-...)
8 Gender and Media in Turkey E. Yanardağoğlu and I. N. Karam. “The fever that hit Arab satellite television: audience perceptions of Turkish TV series.” Identities, 20(5), (2013): 561-579. Screening: Muhteşem Yüzyıl (Magnificent Century, Star TV & Show TV, 2011-2014)
9 Gender and Media in Turkey&beyond 1 E. Cox, “#MeToo is not enough: it has yet to shift the power imbalances that would bring about gender equality”, March 18, 2018. https://theconversation.com/metoo-is-not-enough-it-has-yet-to-shift-the-power-imbalances-that-would-bring-about-gender-equality-92108 N. Karabıyıkoğlu, “Türkiye yayıncılık sektöründe cinsel taciz ve zulüm”, August 2, 2018. http://t24.com.tr/k24/yazi/turkiye-yayincilik-sektorunde-cinsel-taciz,1890
10 Gender and Media in Turkey&beyond 2 E. Dowds, An international legal response to #MeToo, rape and sexual abuse is needed May 4, 2018. https://theconversation.com/an-international-legal-response-to-metoo-rape-and-sexual-abuse-is-needed-95617 S. Kaplan, “Kadını meze olarak gören entelektüeller ülkesi”, 30 August, 2018. http://t24.com.tr/k24/yazi/kadini-meze-olarak-goren-entelektueller-ulkesi,1920 Second Written Assignment: A short review of the #MeToo campaign and tis relation with Turkey
11 LGBTQ+ identity in media T. Peele, “Introduction: Popular Culture, Queer Culture”, Queer Popular Culture: Literature, Media, Film and Television, New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2011. S. 1-8. G. Avila-Saavedra, “Nothing queer about queer television: televized construction of gay masculinities”, Media, Culture and Society, Volume: 31 issue: 1, (2009): 5-21. Screening: Benim Çocuğum, documentary film by Can Candan.
12 New Queer Cinema Rich, R. (2013) New Queer Cinema: The Director’s Cut. Durham & London: Duke University Press. P. 16-39. Screening: Mysterious Skin (Gregg Araki, 2004)
13 Discussion and preperations for the final exam
14 Conclusion
15 Review of the term
16 Review of the term

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

D. Gauntlett, Media, Gender and Identity, London and New York: Routledge, 2002.

Suggested Readings/Materials

The course uses the sources that are listed above

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
30
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
50
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
50
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
12
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
3
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
Final Exam
1
42
    Total
114

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to critically interpret theories, concepts, methods, instruments and ideas that form the basis of Public Relations and Advertising field.

2

To be able to collect and use necessary data to produce content in the field of Public Relations and Advertising with scientific methods.

3

To be able to use theoretical knowledge gained in the field of Public Relations and Advertising in practice.

4

To be able to use analytical thinking skills in the field of Public Relations and Advertising.

5

To be able to convey creative ideas and solution suggestions supported by scientific data in written and oral form to stakeholders.

6

To be able to take responsibility as individual and group members to solve problems encountered in the practice of Public Relations and Advertising field.

7

To be able to develop solutions that favor public good and raise awareness by having knowledge about regional, national and global issues and problems.

8

To be able to relate the basic knowledge of other disciplines supporting the field of Public Relations and Advertising with his/her own field of expertise.

9

To be able to use the knowledge, skills and competencies acquired by following regulations, innovations, changes, current developments, and occupational health and safety practices closely in the field of Public Relations and Advertising; in a lifelong manner and for individual and social purposes.

10

To be able to collect, interpret and share data by considering social, scientific and professional ethical values in the field of Public Relations and Advertising.

11

To be able to collect data in the areas of Public Relations and Advertising and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

12

To be able to speak a second foreign at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest